JSE-HRSC | ISBN 978-078915455-2 | Softcover | $14.95
JSE-HRHC | ISBN 978-075690625-2 | Hardcover | $21.95

The Harlem Renaissance, Student Book

JSE-HRSC | ISBN 978-078915455-2 | Softcover | $14.95
JSE-HRHC | ISBN 978-075690625-2 | Hardcover | $21.95
The Harlem Renaissance, Student Book

What was the Harlem Renaissance? This book from the Literature & Thought series contains literature that challenges the reader, promotes critical thinking, and encourages independent exploration of themes and issues related to the Harlem Renaissance.

$14.95

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$14.95

Contents

Prologue

Dream Variation Langston Hughes

Creating Context

From Still Life in Harlem by Eddy L. Harris • Map of Harlem

Cluster One: What Was Life Like During the Harlem Renaissance?

Thinking Skill: Describing

Seventh Avenue: The Great Black Way (essay)
Jervis Anderson
Laundry Workers’ Choir (vignette)
Vivian Morris
The Typewriter (short story)
Dorothy West
Rent Parties (article)
Frank Byrd
The Tropics in New York (poem)
Claude McKay
Harlem Wine (poem)
Countee Cullen

Cluster Two: What Did Harlem Renaissance Writers Say About Being Black?

Thinking Skill: Analyzing

All God’s Chillun Got Eyes (memoir)
E. Franklin Frazier
Race Pride (essay)
W. E. B. Du Bois
I, Too (poem)
Langston Hughes
Any Human to Another (poem)
Countee Cullen
Black Men, You Shall Be Great Again (essay)
Marcus Garvey
How It Feels to Be Colored Me (essay)
Zora Neale Hurston
The Pink Hat (short story)
Caroline Bond Day
A Black Man Talks of Reaping (poem)
Arna Bontemps

Cluster Three: What Contributions Were Made to American Art and Culture?

Thinking Skill: Generalizing

The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain (essay)
Langston Hughes
Miss Cynthie (short story)
Rudolph Fisher
From “Ellington’s ‘Mood in Indigo’ ” (article)
Janet Mabie
Jazzonia (poem)
Langston Hughes

Cluster Four: Thinking on Your Own

Thinking Skill: Synthesizing

Spike’s Gotta Do It (journal)
Spike Lee
If Black English Isn’t a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is? (article)
James Baldwin
In Search of Zora Neale Hurston (personal narrative)
Alice Walker
There’s a Harlem Renaissance in My Head (prose poem)
Maurice E. Duhon Jr.